Bilateral Funds and Funding Programs to support Inserm-U.S. Partnerships

Non-exhaustive list.

Funding of bilateral scientific projects

Fonds France-UC Berkeley

The France Berkeley Fund was established in 1993 as a partnership between the government of France and the University of California at Berkeley, the France-Berkeley Fund (FBF) promotes scholarly exchange in all disciplines between UC Berkeley and all research centers and public institutions of higher education in France. Through its annual grant competition, the Fund provides seed-money for innovative, bi-national collaborative research. Successful projects bring together senior and junior researchers in a variety of ways, from workshops and conferences to exchanges of researchers in laboratories.

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Fonds France-Stanford

The France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies aims to bridge the disciplines of the humanities, social sciences, sciences, engineering, business and law, addressing historical and contemporary issues of significance for France and the United States from a broad range of perspectives. Its programs bring faculty members, researchers and students from across Stanford's departments and schools into contact with colleagues in France, to explore issues of common intellectual concern, to advance collaborative research, and to foster interdisciplinary inquiry.


The France-Stanford Center seeks to fund research projects across all disciplines. Priority will be given to projects with the potential to develop new collaborations involving junior researchers, and to those leading to collaborative work on interdisciplinary issues. Applications must be submitted jointly by researchers affiliated with a French institution and researchers in any Stanford department, as long as they are eligible to serve as principal investigators. Each project may receive a grant up to $15,000.

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Fonds France-Chicago

France And Chicago Collaborating in The Sciences (FACCTS) is a program designed to enhance science at the University of Chicago by encouraging closer relations between researchers in PSD and BSD and high-level research teams and institutions of higher education in France. It seeks to accomplish this goal by offering seed funding for new projects that promote meaningful academic and scientific exchange, and that show promise of leading to fruitful and sustainable collaboration. Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory and Fermilab, who are unaffiliated with PSD and BSD are now eligible for FACCTS funding, and are encouraged to apply.

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Fonds MIT-France

The MIT-France Seed Fund, a $2 million endowment funded equally by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and MIT, supports new collaborations between faculty and research scientists at MIT and their counterparts in France.

Through an annual call for proposals, the fund primarily supports travel costs for exchange between a team at MIT and colleagues in universities and public research in France. The French colleague(s) must be identified in the proposal. The maximum award is $30,000.

Priority will be given to projects that:

  • propose a balanced exchange between the MIT and French participants
  • demonstrate complementarity between the MIT and French teams

The MIT-France Seed Fund is a part of MISTI Global Seed Funds. All general MISTI Global Seed Funds criteria, application and evaluation procedures apply.

Each year through the MIT-France program, over 80 MIT students intern and conduct research in French companies and labs. The MIT-France Seed Fund facilitates dozens of research collaborations between MIT faculty and their French counterparts. Our partners are leading French companies, universities and research organizations.

Contact Information: Mireille Guyader, Inserm representative at the Embassy of France

Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)

The PIRE Program is an NSF-wide program that supports international activities across all NSF supported disciplines. The primary goal of PIRE is to support high quality projects in which advances in research and education could not occur without international collaboration. PIRE seeks to catalyze a higher level of international engagement in the U.S. science and engineering community.

Average award size : approximately $4 million over 5 years

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The Thomas Jefferson Fund

The Embassy of France in the United States and FACE Foundation are launching the Thomas Jefferson Fund to support cooperation among the most promising young French and American researchers in the Humanities and Social Sciences, the Natural Sciences, and Science for Society. The Thomas Jefferson Fund aims to foster forward-looking collaborative research that addresses the most pressing global challenges.

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Fellowship Programs for students and researchers

Marie Slodowska-Curie actions

The Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions, named after the double Nobel Prize winning Polish-French scientist famed for her work on radioactivity, support researchers at all stages of their careers, irrespective of nationality. Researchers working across all disciplines, from life-saving healthcare to 'blue-sky' science, are eligible for funding. The MSCA also support industrial doctorates, combining academic research study with work in companies, and other innovative training that enhances employability and career development.

In addition to generous research funding, scientists have the possibility to gain experience abroad and in the private sector, and to complete their training with competences or disciplines useful for their careers. More information about various funding schemes and requirements for applying is available below.

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Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP)

The Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP) is an international program of research support, funding frontier research on the complex mechanisms of living organisms. Research is funded at all levels of biological complexity from biomolecules to the interactions between organisms.

Selection of awards is made by high level, expert international review committees. Research Grants enable scientists from different countries to collaborate on focused innovative projects that are expected to open new fields of investigation. Interdisciplinary collaborations are especially encouraged. Postdoctoral fellowships enable the most talented early career scientists, trained in the life sciences or in the physical sciences, to extend their scientific repertoire in laboratories abroad.

Former HFSP Fellows who return to their home country or move to a third HFSP member country can apply for a Career Development Award to support their transition to independence.

HFSP awardees are brought together in an annual meeting to help build a global network of like-minded scientists working on a broad range of subjects within the life sciences and to stimulate new collaborations.

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STEM Chateaubriand Fellowship

The Chateaubriand Fellowship in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics & Health for doctoral students aims to initiate or reinforce collaborations, partnerships or joint projects between French and American research teams. The Chateaubriand Fellowship supports PhD students registered in an American University who wish to conduct part of their doctoral research in a French laboratory.

This fellowship is offered by the Office for Science & Technology (OST) of the Embassy of France in the United States in partnership with American Universities and French Research organizations such as Inserm, Inria and CNRS. It is also a partner of the National Science Foundation’s GROW program.

The OST and its partners provide Chateaubriand fellows with a monthly stipend of up to 1400 € (depending on other sources of funding) for a 4-9 month period and support for travel expenses and student health insurance. All STEM and Health disciplines are eligible. The required level of French remains at the discretion of the host laboratory.

The call for applications is open each year from October to January for fellowships starting between September and April of the following academic year.

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The Fulbright Scholar Program

The Fulbright Program was established in 1946 under legislation introduced by then-Senator J. William Fulbright of Arkansas. The Fulbright Program is sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs.

The Fulbright Program awards approximately 8,000 grants annually. Roughly 1,600 U.S. students, 4,000 foreign students, 1,200 U.S. scholars, and 900 visiting scholars receive awards, in addition to several hundred teachers and professionals. Approximately 310,000 "Fulbrighters" have participated in the Program since its inception in 1946.

Currently, the Fulbright Program operates in over 155 countries worldwide.

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Campus France USA

Campus France USA is a service provided by the French Embassy in the United States to promote French higher education system to students and education stakeholders in the United States.

Campus France USA assists students in the United States (American citizens and foreigners studying and/or living in the United States) who wish to pursue academic projects at an institution of higher education in France for over a 3-month period.

All American students and foreign students living in the United States (including those under the age of 18) who wish to study at a higher education institution in France for over three months must follow the appropriate Campus France application procedure before applying for a visa at their assigned consulate.

Campus France USA’s website is constantly updated with the latest information about: